Being in Transition; Being Enough

Confession. I’m terrible with transitions. The in-between time. I’m not patient and want things to happen in my own time and when they don’t I think it is because I’ve done something wrong. I am the first to turn on myself for not being good enough, smart enough, talented enough. Not enough. I’m currently in a transition. For the first time since 2011 I don’t have a book or writing deadline of any kind. I don’t have a good finished draft of anything because the one that I thought was kinda sorta done and I Read More

You Never Know…And Other Things I Learned (Remembered) on the Road: Part Two

In my last entry, I wrote about some of my observations as an author who took herself on tour for the first time. Now, I am going to share with you a few things I did while travelling that kept me centred. I knew when I started this tour that I was going to essentially be “on” for seven days, which meant that I needed to remind myself to do things that would keep me balanced. Pack for Success (Or maybe I overpacked, who is to say?): Deb Ohi has this very helpful post about how to Read More

You Never Know…And Other Things I Learned (Remembered) on the Road: Part One

I’ve returned from my adventure very tired, but also ready to get to work. I’ve written about how I had wanted to go out east and have spent the last two months preparing for it. I’ve learned a lot about organizing book tours (and why people have assistants… to all assistants, I salute you!), and what I might do differently next time. I also learned about the unmeasurables, the things you cannot even begin to imagine, that (most) people are grateful that you came and shared your story. This blog post got very long, so I Read More

Mel’s Week of Unplanned Symmetry

The writer life is weird and wonderful. One week there could be a series of events converging at the same time and you try believing in your incredible luck and the next…a silence so quiet that you wonder if you’re any good and why you’re bothering to do it in the first place. This week was a lucky week. A grateful week. A week where I’m doing my best to celebrate success, without feeling guilty and also being comfortable with being out in the world. TUESDAY: I talked about this and my path to publication on Read More

Guest Post: Deborah Kerbel, Author of Feathered

Book Birthdays are the perfect way to celebrate spring. And today is Deborah Kerbel’s special book birthday, as we celebrate her sixth (SIXTH!) novel, Feathered. When Deborah told me about her new novel, I was intrigued. First , it is historical fiction, set in 1980. (And, yes, it is weird to think that something during my lifetime is historical fiction, but there it is.)  Second, her main character Finch, is obsessed with Little House on the Prairie.  I’m thrilled that she agreed to come on the blog to chat about writing this novel, all things Read More

An Interview with Nicole Winters, Author of The Jock and the Fat Chick

I met Nicole Winters through a local Toronto writers group that supports Canadian authors and illustrators, Torkidlit. We get together once a month, talk shop, and celebrate our successes. Nicole was one of the first people I connected with. Genuine, kind and driven, she is a writer who is interested in telling stories for kids and teens who may not be the best readers, perhaps even called “reluctant,” as she was. She will bravely write in different genres for different age groups. As you’ll see from her bio below, her first YA novel, TT Full Read More

An Interview with Ingrid Sundberg, Author of All We Left Behind

Everything is circular. My first post of 2015 was the exclusive Canadian cover reveal of Ingrid Sundberg’s YA novel, All We Left Behind, and here we are at the end of the year with an interview celebrating the book’s release earlier this month. Since its release, Ingrid’s novel has been featured on a number of “Best of” lists, and with her #shareyoursecrets  campaign, raised awareness on the importance for people to share their stories. This is because Ingrid’s gorgeous novel explores how keeping these important things buried, can impact everything and that by telling one person, can be Read More

A Q&A with Trina St. Jean, Author of Blank

I am pretty pleased to introduce you to Trina St. Jean, a new Canadian YA writer . Interestingly story, I met Trina when I lived in Montreal through a mutual friend in the early part of the 2000s and she was talking about attending this mythical school where one could study children’s literature and work with writers like, Tim Wynne-Jones. It was only a few years later that I made the connection that it was the Vermont College of Fine Arts. When I discovered that Trina’s new YA novel, Blank —about a teen who wakes Read More

Mel’s Long Overdue Post: An Overplanner in Recovery

I had the summer all planned. MAY: Submit the next draft of the Maud novel after an incredible ten days doing social media for the National Reading Campaign’s Reading Town in Charlottetown, P.E.I.             MAY to JUNE: Prep for backfilling a course for six weeks and prepare for an inspiring ten day writing retreat and alumni-mini-res at VCFA where I was workshopping a new piece with a writer I had always wanted to work with, Cynthia Leitich-Smith — who really is made of awesome and kinda wanna be her when I grow Read More

An Interview with Karen Krossing, Punch Like a Girl

Over the past year I have had the pleasure of getting to know Karen Krossing. A compassionate writer, she is committed to understanding and helping other writers — including me. I have read a few of her books this year, including Bog, which won the 2015 SCBWI Crystal Kite Award in the Canada division, and is a 2014 OLA Best Bets selection. Karen isn’t afraid to use story as a way to delve into difficult subjects and her latest novel, Punch Like a Girl, certainly demonstrates this. (Warning this might trigger some readers.) There has been Read More